WINNER OF THE NATIONAL POETRY SERIES

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    Meredith Stricker's Tenderness Shore is a passionate and luminous collection of poetry that explores the iconography of the Muse as a wilderness retreat for the imagination. Opening with a series of exchanges with Sappho - Plato's tenth muse - in letters, shopping lists, postcards, choreography, and maps, then delving into the landscape of Lesbos using a lexicon to track the roots and impulses of the lyric, the collection closes with encounters among a chorus of muses: Sappho, Camus, Piaf, and birds speaking in Hungarian. Tenderness Shore affirms that the Muse, or the human capacity to muse, can be found in any part of life - nature, photographs, art, memory - that resists being measured in terms of profit and loss.

Meredith Stricker's Tenderness Shore is a passionate and luminous collection of poetry that explores the iconography of the Muse as a wilderness retreat for the imagination. Opening with a series of exchanges with Sappho - Plato's tenth muse - in letters, shopping lists, postcards, choreography, and maps, then delving into the landscape of Lesbos using a lexicon to track the roots and impulses of the lyric, the collection closes with encounters among a chorus of muses: Sappho, Camus, Piaf, and birds speaking in Hungarian. Tenderness Shore affirms that the Muse, or the human capacity to muse, can be found in any part of life - nature, photographs, art, memory - that resists being measured in terms of profit and loss.